New Orleans History -- Lake Pontchartrain
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
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Schools

When I was in the second grade at Lafayette School on Carrollton Avenue in the mid forties my teacher was a beautiful young lady named Miss Robert. We pronounced it as “Robear.” I had the most intense crush on this teacher, so much so, that it caused me to get tongue-tied whenever I tried to talk to her. It never dawned on me that teachers were human and had lives away from school until one weekend when I was walking on Barrone Street.

There in front of me, walking toward me were two Miss Robears! I couldn’t believe my eyes and started stuttering and stammering as she saw me and gave me that bright beautiful smile. Seems Miss Robear had a twin sister and they were really human and shopped like we did downtown! I would never have believed it if I didn’t see it with my own two eyes.
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How about St. Leo the Great school when there was a traffic circle joining St. Bernard Avenue, Desaix Boulevard and Gentilly Boulevard? The Bell Theater at Gentilly and Grande Route St. John? Riding the St. Bernard bus to Canal and Basin and catching a movie at the Saenger or Loew's State Theaters wit' ya Mama? (and guys would whistle at ya' Mama while ya' wuz waitin' at da bus stops?)
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Remember when the teacher would run into the classroom late and start handing out wet ditto papers--fresh off the press and kind of smeary. I loved that. All the kids would hold the paper up to their noses and take a big whiff. Now a days a teacher might be sued for exposing the kids to some kind of toxic substance. Ah, the good old days.
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So many... Lets see I started off with Kindergarten at Lafayette Then to St Stephens on Napoleon , Then there was a while where we lived in CA. Then back again to NOLA where I went to AD Crossman's. Then Etiene De Bore <-- sp? Then I went to Mc Donogh #7. Then back to St Stephen's for my junior years.

By BonnieJ
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Went to St. Catherine first through fifth grades, then St. Christopher for sixth through eighth.

I've maintained a friendship to this day with one of my friends from St. Christopher, and even though she is now in Houston, and I'm in Tulsa, we always turn to each other in times of family crisis because it's so comfortable and easy to talk about our respective crazy families. We can cut straight to the problem at hand without wasting time trying to fill in background information.

By OKYat
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St. Francis of Assisi on State Street up by da pawk (Audubon). Those nuns were from either Chicago or St. Louis and were the meanest old (w)itches with midwest mentality I've ever met. Guess that's why I sort of have a prejudice against midwesterners. They had the audacity to call themselves the Sisters of Christian Charity!!! Nothin' charitable about those old crones.

The old nuns who taught me were probably all gone by '74. I went there back in the late '50's and early '60's.

By Rita
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I went to St Francis too, my Aunt Sister Jean taught there for a short time then moved on to St Raphels. Graduated in 74.

We lived on Joseph St between Camp and Chestnut.

By Barry
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St. Dominic on Harrison Avenue in Lakeview. The school's still there; I think the current church is from around 1960 or so, but our church was the little red brick building behind the current church. I'm in touch with only two classmates from my gramma school days. Oddly enough, they both live in Florida now. (With me in Canada, they've become long-distance friendships!)

by LakeviewGal
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B.M Palmer. Don't know if it is still there. 1 block off St. Claude on Clouet St.

by Mike
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St. Lawrence the Martyr in Metairie (approximately 2 blocks off of Vets going toward the river from CompUSA which was formerly the Westgate Drive Inn & The Steinway Lounge).

Not many people outside of the "Parish" seemed to know it existed. I always figured it was because it was nestled into the Westgate neighborhood (right next to the former Westgate Elementary School, now John Maggiori School) so nobody ever saw it except people from the neighborhood.

It's one of those Archdiocesan schools that closed a few years ago. Sad day for me. Good memories. Great lifelong friends.

by Cathy
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I Remembah St. Lawrence da Mawtah
Posted by: OKYat at Sun Jul 14 16:18:43 2002
Message:
I was a bridesmaid in a wedding there, and the reception was in "da parish hall" probably the cafeteria. I don't really remember as there was more than a little alcohol consumed before, during and after the wedding.
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Mt. Carmel, on Robt. E. Lee Blvd. in Lakeview...
Posted by: LakeviewGal at Fri Jul 12 21:49:18 2002
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Ursuline
Posted by: Boo (formerly BB) at Sat Jul 13 07:11:46 2002
Message:
Had to take the Metry, Louisiana Ave., Tulane, Claiborne buses to get there on the mornings my father didn't feel like driving me.
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Francis T Nicholls on St. Claude St. It has been renamed, like so many others, and is now called Frederick Douglass.

Posted by: Mike at Sat Jul 13 04:24:29 2002
Message:
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Rabouin = 'Rob-when' . A vocational training high school.
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Sacred Hawt = Sacred Heart High School on Canal Street (not to be confused with Sacred Heart Academy on St. Charles Avenue), as in 'Yeah, Dawlin'! Dem dances at Sacred Hawt was unbearable! I wisht dey wudda passed out dem gas masses at da doah! Muss (musk perfume) was like, eeeee-uuuuuuu! Da whole gym reeeked of it! Yeh. n' ya combine da smell wit da Spray Net, n' it gets nauzzzy-ate-n.'
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Sophie B. Wright School



This bookplate was used to mark the collection of the Sophie B. Wright School, named in honor of the New Orleans educator. Miss Wright founded the Home Institute in 1883, a school for children and young ladies, which later expanded to offered night classes to males as well as females. She died in 1912, only a month before the new school--originally a high school for girls--was dedicated.

Source: http://www.nutrias.org/~nopl/monthly/may2000/sophie.htm
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Newcomb College



Ellsworth Woodward (1861-1939) was a founder, with his brother William, of the Newcomb College school of art, famous in the Woodwards' day for the production of Newcomb pottery. This art deco-influenced bookplate was designed by Ellsworth Woodward himself, perhaps for the use of both brothers. The image and its accompanying motto speak to their vocation as educators of young women.

Source: http://www.nutrias.org/~nopl/monthly/may2000/woodw.htm
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St. Aloysius



St. Aloysius College (later St. Aloysius High School) can trace its origins all the way back to 1869, but New Orleanians today remember the boys' school run by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart which operated at the corner of Rampart Street and Esplanade Avenue. In 1969, the school merged with Cor Jesu High School, a second Sacred Heart Brothers school which had opened on Elysian Fields in 1954, and became Brother Martin High School.

Source: http://www.nutrias.org/~nopl/monthly/mar98/mar98.htm